Helping Humble Arts and Supporting MOCP – artmarketblog.com

Help Humble Arts and Support the MOCP – artmarketblog.com

 Stein, Amy $300.00  Hillside from the series Domesticated, 2007 C-print 11 x 13 3/4 inches on 14 x 16.75 inch paper Edition of 50.  Available from the MoCP

Stein, Amy $300.00 Hillside from the series Domesticated, 2007 C-print 11 x 13 3/4 inches on 14 x 16.75 inch paper Edition of 50. Available from the MoCP

The financial crisis has undoubtedly had a significant effect on the arts especially those non-profit organisations that are the backbone of the art world. Many non-profit art organisations have funding programs that involve the sale of works of art so why not help support the arts and take advantage of some of the bargains currently available. The Humble Arts Foundation is a well known not-for-profit organisation that works to advance the careers of emerging fine art photographers. Like many other arts organisations, the Humble Arts Foundation is doing it tough. There are two ways you can help the Humble Arts Foundation. The first involves making a tax deductable donation of $15 or more which, if 3500 people obliged, would give Humble enough funds to continue supporting and exhibiting the work of emerging art photographers through 2012. The second way you can help support Humble is by purchasing one of their fantastic limited edition prints. To sweeten the deal a discount of 30% is available to those who use the code HAF30 which makes the Humble prints even better value.

To make a donation go here:
https://www.fracturedatlas.org/site/contribute/donate/1138

or to view the available prints go here:
http://humbleartsfoundation.org/editions/index.html

Another photography related organisation that I’m sure would love your support is the Museum of Contemporary Photography in Chicago. According to their website the Museum of Contemporary Photography (MoCP) is the only museum in the Midwest with an exclusive commitment to the medium of photography. By presenting projects and exhibitions that embrace a wide range of contemporary aesthetics and technologies, the Museum strives to communicate the value and significance of photographic images as expressions of human thought, imagination, and creativity. The MoCP recently launched their 2009 series of fine photographic prints which includes works by Amy Stein and Michael Wolf. To see all the fantastic prints available check out:
http://mocp.org/shop/index.php?main_page=index&cPath=11
**Nicholas Forrest is an art market analyst, art critic and journalist based in Sydney, Australia. He is the founder of http://www.artmarketblog.com, writes the art column for the magazine Antiques and Collectibles for Pleasure and Profit and contributes to many other publications.

Photography Auction at iGavel – artmarkeblog.com

Photography Auction at iGavel – artmarkeblog.com

William Eggleston, Untitled (Reflectors), c. 1970's

William Eggleston, Untitled (Reflectors), c. 1970's

As I have mentioned before, the great thing about iGavel auctions is that all the sellers are professionals and all the objects offered on the iGavel site are guaranteed for authenticity and condition. The only way anyone other than the a registered associate of iGavel can sell an item on the site is by consigning items through one of the iGavel associates. This means that the items being sold on iGavel are all sold by industry professionals. Founded by Lark Mason, the former director of online auctions at Sothebys, iGavel is a fantastic source of top quality fine art at reasonable prices.

One of the most popular sellers on iGavel is Daniel Cooney Fine Art, a Brooklyn based gallery specialising in photographs and works on paper. Daniel Cooney Fine Art hold auctions on iGavel three times a year and always have fantastic range of works to choose from at very good prices. The current auction which ends on the 18th of February offers some beautiful images by long time luminaries such as William Eggleston, Joel Meyerowitz and Garry Winogrand. The auction also features a group of portfolios and books by Dorothy Norman, Ralph Gibson and Jerome Liebling among others.

See the works available and bid here:
http://auction.igavel.com/ClientInfo.taf?_function=info&id=2846&skip=1

All lots available for viewing at Daniel Cooney Fine Art during regular business hours and by appointment.

Daniel Cooney Fine Art
511 West 25th Street, #506
New York, NY 10001,
212 255 8158
dan@danielcooneyfineart.com
Gallery Hours: Tuesday – Saturday 11 – 6 and by appointment.

**Nicholas Forrest is an art market analyst, art critic and journalist based in Sydney, Australia. He is the founder of http://www.artmarketblog.com, writes the art column for the magazine Antiques and Collectibles for Pleasure and Profit and contributes to many other publications.

Daniel Cooney Emerging Photographers Auction – artmarketblog.com

Daniel Cooney Emerging Photographers Auction – artmarketblog.com

"The Divide"

"The Divide"

Daniel Cooney Fine Art is currently conducting an online auction on igavel of 40 photographs by some of the best emerging photographers.  Amy Finkelstein, Juliana Beasley, Nina Buesing, Shen Wei and Jon Feinstein are just some of the artists whose work is included in the auction. Daniel Cooney Fine Art is a highly respected gallery based in Chelsea, NY that deals primarily in photographs and works on paper by emerging artists and under recognised work by established artists. According to igavel “Daniel Cooney Fine Art is proud to announce our second Emerging Photographers Auction with iGavel. The auction is a curated group of 40 images by very promising emerging talent. This is a special opportunity to introduce young artists to collectors at all levels as all reserves are set at $200.” You can view the available works and submit bids here:
http://auction.igavel.com/AuctionHelp.taf?S=N&R=2&C=2&return=50&sort=1&ST=1&days=&category_id=&_start=1&keyword=E1DA&_UserReference=7F000001477C6F560C1CB431B343495F75C2

In my opinion, the best work in the auction is “The Divide” by Mark William Fernandes. What impresses me the most about “The Divide” is the way that Fernandes has used captured moments of a natural and random event in a way that appears to have been carefully orchestrated. The patterns and shapes created by the waves and the pools appear to have been purposely placed in the position they appear in to create a balanced abstract composition. I also love the intensity and energy of this photo which is enhanced by the moody lighting that is reminiscent of the dark, moody paintings of the Dutch masters. According to Fernandes (from igavel website): “I use photography to (re-)construct how I wish to perceive my vision, rather than what I really see. My work deals with memory and recurrent themes based on the collapsing of time and space through a conceptual process of digital manipulation of photographs. My subjects are drawn from my interest in non-linear perception. My artistic process is based on the fragmenting and reconstructing of space. My photographs are composed of multiple moments in time. I create an extended archive of the moment, in which I take numerous shots of the same scene or space, each image shifting slightly in time and viewpoint. I seek out and construct imagery that transports the viewer to an alternative version of reality. The dreamlike, ambiguous nature of my images does not provide an answer to whether the represented content really happened.”

Fernandes was born in Munich, Germany and is a graduate of the prestigious Parsons MFA program. His has been exhibited in group shows in Australia, USA, Germany and Turkey and has been featured in several publications. You can find our more about Mark and his work at his website http://www.markfernandes.net/ and you can bid on “The Divide” here:
http://auction.igavel.com/Bidding.taf?_function=detail&Auction_uid1=1251516&_UserReference=7F000001477C6F560C1CB431B343495F75C2#Image1

image: “The Divide” by Mark William Fernandes

Description
Archival Pigment print, signed, dated, numbered “4/15″ in ink on the reverse.

Provenance
Directly from the artist.

Measurements
9 x 17.5” image size.

**Nicholas Forrest is an art market analyst, art critic and journalist based in Sydney, Australia. He is the founder of http://www.artmarketblog.com, writes the art column for the magazine Antiques and Collectibles for Pleasure and Profit and contributes to many other publications.

Korean Photographer Myoung Ho Lee – artmarketblog.com

Korean Photographer Myoung Ho Lee – artmarketblog.com

Tree #1 by Myoung Ho Lee

Tree #1 by Myoung Ho Lee

A tree or a picture of a tree?, that is the question. Well it’s not THE question but it is the question that one asks ones self when confronted with the awesome  “Tree” series of photographs by Myoung Ho Lee. Myoung Ho Lee is a young Seoul, Korea based artist and a lecturer in photography at the Joon-Ang University where he is also completing a PH. D. The “Tree” series was first shown online on the Lens Culture website and it was the “Tree” series of photographs that attracted world wide attention to Lee and his work. According to the Lens Culture website (http://www.lensculture.com) where selected works from Lee’s “Tree” series are available for purchase: “Simple in concept, complex in execution, he makes us look at a tree in its natural surroundings, but separates the tree artificially from nature by presenting it on an immense white ground, as one would see a painting or photograph on a billboard.”

Lee’s work is an excellent example of the high quality and unique work being produced by artists from Korea where there seems to me no shortage of support and encouragement for visual artists. Festivals celebrating visual art such as the Daegu Photo Biennale,Gwangju Biennale, Busan Biennale, and Korea International Art Fair give Korean artists and galleries plenty of opportunities to promote themselves.  It is not surprising that Korea has produced some absolutely fantastic artists in the last couple of years which has resulted in a rapidly developing art market that has the potential to be one of the most influential markets in the Asia Pacific region. I have written several articles expressing my enthusiasm for the Korean art scene which has continued to grow as more and more fantastic Korean artists emerge from the shadows of their more famous Chinese counterparts.

Of particular importance to Lee’s career is the show his “Tree” series of work that will be held at the highly prestigious Yossi Milo gallery in New York from March 12–April 18, 2009. The exhibition at Yossi Milo gallery will undoubtedly have a positive effect on Lee’s work so my suggestion is to buy now before prices increase.

You can see the works available from Lens Culture here:
http://www.lensculture.com/myoung.html

Details of the Myoung Ho Lee exhibition at Yossi Milo here:
http://www.yossimilo.com/artists/myou_ho_lee/

and more info on the “Tree” series here:
http://www.lensculture.com/Myoung-Ho-Lee-FOAM-2008.pdf

**Nicholas Forrest is an art market analyst, art critic and journalist based in Sydney, Australia. He is the founder of http://www.artmarketblog.com, writes the art column for the magazine Antiques and Collectibles for Pleasure and Profit and contributes to many other publications.

Photography Collection Wows Market – artmarketblog.com

Photography Collection Wows Market – artmarketblog.com

$5,000-7,000),

Photo by Erwitt, Winogrand (estimate: $5,000-7,000),

The Constantiner Collection of Photographs went under the hammer on the 16th and 17th of December at Christie’s New York. A total of US$7,721,875 against an estimate of US$7.5 million to US$11 million represented a very successful sale especially considering that the collection achieved the highest total for a single owner dedicated photographs sale at Christie’s. As I have reported in previous posts, a trend has become evident in recent months where sales of single owner collections are achieving extremely good results both in terms of the percentage of works being sold and the total value of works sold.  The results of the Constantiner Collection suggest that this trend is continuing.  To read an explanation of this trend see these posts:

Single Owner Art Auctions Defy Downturn – artmarketblog.com
http://artmarketblog.com/2008/12/15/single-owner-art-auctions-defy-downturn-artmarketblogcom/

Single-Owner Art Sale Success Part 2 – artmarketblog.com
http://artmarketblog.com/2008/12/17/single-owner-art-sale-success-part-2-artmarketblogcom/

Included in the sale of the collection which was assembled by Leon and Michaela Constantiner were works by Warhol, Newton, Mapplethorpe, Penn and others. According to a Christie’s press release “this spectacular collection focused on photography as a key shaping force within the media worlds that have, for over half a century, celebrated fashion, style, celebrity and desire”. The collection included a particularly large and impressive selection of works by Helmut Newton as well as a number of photographs of Marilyn Monroe who was the focus of the collection. The highlight of the auction was a work by Newton titled “Sie Kommen, (Naked and Dressed)” which sold for US$662,500 (estimate US$400,000-600,000) which is a new auction record for Newton.

See Constantiner Collection results press release here:
http://www.christies.com/presscenter/pdf/12182008/124223.pdf

**Nicholas Forrest is an art market analyst, art critic and journalist based in Sydney, Australia. He is the founder of http://www.artmarketblog.com, writes the art column for the magazine Antiques and Collectibles for Pleasure and Profit and contributes to many other publications.

Catherine Opie at Side Street Projects – artmarketblog.com

Catherine Opie at Side Street Projects – artmarketblog.com

Catherine Opie Untitled (Side Street Projects' Mobile Headquarters) (2008)

Catherine Opie "Untitled" (Side Street Projects' Mobile Headquarters) (2008)

Side Street Projects is an artist-run organization that helps visual artists negotiate the baffling terrain of the contemporary art world and provides art related youth education services. As part of their fundraising program Side Street projects are selling prints of works by some of the top contemporary artists including a work by the world renowned photographer Catherine Opie which can be viewed here: http://www.sidestreet.org/16/index.html

According to the sidestreet.org website: Arguably one of the most important living American photographers, Catherine Opie’s work is an ongoing investigation into the identity of contemporary America and its cities, communities, and people. The structure of urban and suburban space and how communities begin to form and the identities that surround these communities is the connective tissue found within her work. Opie’s work has always investigated the figure in relation to the landscape – she is an expert in both portrait and landscape and her work disregards the polarities typically found within these approaches. Opie’s work offers reflection upon the authority vested in photography to communicate specific group parameters within a society and conversely how images amplify human individualization.

Her acclaimed mid-career retrospective, Catherine Opie: American Photographer, is currently on exhibit at the Guggenheim Museum in New York through January 7th, 2009. . She has been the subject of exhibitions throughout Europe and the United States. Recent solo exhibitions include Regen Projects, Los Angeles; the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; The Saint Louis Art Museum, St. Louis; Photographers’ Gallery, London; Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; and Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles.

>About This Print
The image is of the new mobile headquarters of Side Street Projects which consists of a pair of restored vintage travel trailers, manufactured by J. Paul Getty’s Spartan Aircraft Corporation which now house a wireless communication system which runs on a 3,000 watt solar energy array which is (of course) also on wheels. Side Street Projects recently refurbished these vintage travel trailers and turned them into their first-ever “permanent” facility.

Details of print:

Catherine Opie
Untitled (Side Street Projects’ Mobile Headquarters) (2008)
Archival Pigment Print (From a Digital Photo)
Archival Hahnemuhle Photo Rag Paper (20″ x 16”
Limited Edition of 50
$1,000 (CA residents add 8.25% tax)

There are only a couple of the Opie prints left so if you would like to purchase one visit http://www.sidestreet.org/16/index.html

There are also other works available which can be viewed here:
http://www.sidestreet.org/store/index.html

**Nicholas Forrest is an art market analyst, art critic and journalist based in Sydney, Australia. He is the founder of http://www.artmarketblog.com, writes the art column for the magazine Antiques and Collectibles for Pleasure and Profit and contributes to many other publications.

Paris Photo Auction Bucks Trend – artmarketblog.com

Paris Photo Auction Bucks Trend – artmarketblog.com

Baron Jean-Baptiste-Louis Gros (1793-1870), Vue du salon du Baron Gros, vers 1850-1857

Baron Jean-Baptiste-Louis Gros (1793-1870), Vue du salon du Baron Gros, vers 1850-1857

As one of the most important private collections of 19th century photography to have ever been assembled, the sale of the collection of Marie-Thérèse and André Jammes by Sotheby’s offered collectors and investors the opportunity to acquire some of the most historically important photographs in existence.  The importance of this collection was highlighted by the final of the four part sale that took place on the 15th of November achieving a total of €2,029,876 total from 192 lots which equated to 72.4% sold by lot and 79.6% by value – an extremely positive result at a time when sales that total less than 60% by value have become the norm. Highlights of the sale included a full-plate daguerreotype (c.1850-57) by Baron Jean-Baptiste Louis Gros which sold for €216,750 (lot 7, estimate €150,000-200,000), an 1850s wax-paper negative by John Beasley Greene that sold for €48,750 (lot 3 estimate €15,000-18,000) and a daguerreotype by Joseph-Philibert Girault de Prangey titled “Great Mosque in Jerusalem” which fetched €55,950 (lot 21 estimate €25,000-35,000). The collection of Marie-Thérèse and André Jammes was sold by Sotheby’s in four parts the first of which went under the hammer in 1999 in London achieving a total of US$12.3 million for 265 lots. The second and third parts of the sale of the collection took place in March of 2002 and were devoted to Charles Nègre and French 19th Century Photography. The combined total of parts two and three was €11,814,210 which included the sale of the first-ever image made using a photographic process for €489,750

Marie-Thérèse and André Jammes were Antiquarian booksellers in Paris who developed their collection over a period of more than 40 years acquiring works from industry contacts, dealers and collectors.
According to a Sotheby’s press release from 2002 “André Jammes had the vision of building a study collection of early photographs in 1955, when he was still in his twenties. Continuing a family tradition, he had, from a young age, developed a passion for books and the processes of creating them. He was especially interested in the evolution of typography and calligraphy, and has published important research in these subjects. Such interests became a stepping stone into the then largely neglected field of the history of photography. Jammes was drawn to the medium and soon recognised that the early history of photography deserved to be better effectively researched and better appreciated. Monsieur and Madame Jammes justly regarded the invention of photography as a development of enormous importance, comparable to that of printing in the 15th century.”
http://files.shareholder.com/downloads/BID/472507551x0x103759/0c92dcc0-b739-4b1a-8aef-d6c3e1a6fdb1/20020108-68954.pdf

More information on the Marie-Thérèse and André Jammes can be found here:
http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9407E0D9163EF930A35753C1A96F958260&sec=&spon=&pagewanted=1

The fact that Jammes sold the best part of his collection to the J. Paul Getty Museum prior to auctioning off the remaining works through Sotheby’s makes on wonder what the results of the sale could have been had the very best works from the collection been sold.

**Nicholas Forrest is an art market analyst, art critic and journalist based in Sydney, Australia. He is the founder of http://www.artmarketblog.com, writes the art column for the magazine Antiques and Collectibles for Pleasure and Profit and contributes to many other publications.

Henson Porn Debate Goes International – artmarketblog.com

Henson Porn Debate Goes International – artmarketblog.com

A year ago I wrote a post on the controversy surrounding world renowned Australian photographer Bill Henson whose use of images of naked adolescent boys and girls made headlines when a selection of his works were confiscated by police.(see original post here)
The response to my post on Henson was quite heated which I hope will continue now that new information has come to light.

Since I wrote that post there has been continued controversy surrounding Henson’s work the most recent of which involved the revelation that the artist had been allowed to tour the premises of a school to search for potential adolescent subjects for his photos. (see here:
http://news.theage.com.au/national/henson-scouted-school-for-child-models-20081004-4tnh.html)
There has been an understandably strong reaction to this news which, although shocking, has not seemed to have had a negative effect on the popularity of Henson’s work.

The debate regarding Henson’s actions has gone international with the artist’s first show since the one in Sydney that was shut shut down by Police currently being held (until the 15th of November) at Robert Miller Gallery which can be found at 524 West 26th Street New York City. (see here:
http://www.robertmillergallery.com/exhibitions/current/imags.html)
According to the exhibition press release “Bill Henson’s photographs, first exhibited at Robert Miller in 2004, revealed the artist as a passionate and visionary explorer of twilight zones and dichotomies including nature and civilisation, youth and adulthood, and male and female. These beautiful and mysterious images are charachterised by chiaroscuro, translucent skin tones, and jewel-like colours that add an ethereal quality to ambiguous settings” Although the work of Henson has not created as much of a furore in New York as yet there has been plenty of media attention surrounding the show which should ensure that plenty of New Yorkers have all the information they need to form an opinion. (see here: http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/story/0,25197,24513728-16947,00.html)

Let me know your thoughts regarding the latest Bill Henson developments.

Original post on Bill Henson:

http://artmarketblog.com/2007/10/31/when-pornography-is-pornography-and-not-fine-art/

image:

Bill Henson
Untitled, 2005-2006
Type “C” colour photograph, ed. 5
127×177.8cm
Part of Robert Miller Gallery’s Bill Henson Show

**Nicholas Forrest is an art market analyst, art critic and journalist based in Sydney, Australia. He is the founder of http://www.artmarketblog.com, writes the art column for the magazine Antiques and Collectibles for Pleasure and Profit and contributes to many other publications.

New Photo Edition and Aperture Auction – artmarketblog.com

New Photo Edition and Aperture Auction – artmarketblog.com

The Humble Arts Foundation have just launched their latest limited edition photograph which is by the New York based photographer Sarah Wilmer. Untitled 2007 is from the artist’s Cryosphere series which are images of frozen landscapes that I think look like the result of some sort of post-apocalyptic ice age. As well as being eerily beautiful images, Wilmer’s Cryosphere series is also a poignant reminder of how fragile and vulnerable the various ecosystems of our world are. Especially those that rely on such a delicate balance such as the Cryosphere.

Wilmer has an extensive and impressive cv that includes being chosen as one of Photo District News magazine’s “Top 30 New and Emerging Photographers to Watch” in 2007 and as part of this year’s V Magazine “Photographers to Watch” spread. Wilmer’s full cv can be viewed on her website here:
http://www.sarahwilmer.com/pdf/sarahwilmer_cv.pdf. To purchase this engaging and beautiful work of art visit the Humble Arts website here:
http://www.humbleartsfoundation.org/editions/latest.html

Image:
SARAH WILMER
Untitled, 2007
From Cryosphere
C-print
Paper: 16 x 20 inches
Image: 18.5 x 15 inches
Signed and numbered
Edition of 5

$395.00 / purchase print

Keeping on the topic of photography, the Aperture Foundation will be holding their 2008 BENEFIT AND AUCTION on Wednesday the 22nd of October in New York at Pier 60, Chelsea Piers.
Details:
6:30–8:00 p.m. Cocktails and Silent Auction
8:00–10:00 p.m. Dinner, Live Auction, and Award Ceremony

All proceeds benefit Aperture Foundation’s publications, exhibitions, and public programs at Aperture Gallery and at other venues worldwide.

Interested bidders may place bids during the 2008 Benefit and Auction. Absentee bids may also be placed up via fax, (212) 979-7759, using the absentee bid form on this website, until Wednesday, October 22 at 12:00 noon EST. Bids will be entered on absentee bidders’ behalf at the event, up to their maximum bids.

For tickets and for more information about the event, please contact Michiko Simanjuntak Grasso at (212) 946-7149 or mgrasso@aperture.org

The catalogue of items being auction is pretty fantastic with standout works by Mauricio Alejo, Richard Misrach, Polixeni Papapetrou, Brian Ulrich and Martin Parr to name just a few. The full catalogue can be viewed here:
http://www.aperture.org/auction/items.php
If you can’t make it to the auction then you can still bid on the works via an absentee bid form which can be found here:
http://www.aperture.org/auction/absenteeform.pdf

**Nicholas Forrest is an art market analyst, art critic and journalist based in Sydney, Australia. He is the founder of http://www.artmarketblog.com, writes the art column for the magazine Antiques and Collectibles for Pleasure and Profit and contributes to many other publications.

Danger of Careless Art Market Talk – artmarketblog.com

Danger of Careless Art Market Talk – artmarketblog.com

A Sotheby’s auction here in Australia on the 26th of August did not go as well as was anticipated with just less than half of the works selling and a final sales figure of AUD$5.77 million without buyers premium against an estimate of $9-$12 million. According to an article in the Australian newspaper, Georgina Pemberton, Sotheby’s head of paintings, described last night’s result as “a reflection of our economic climate and we are now going through a correction in the art market” After making this comment to the Australian newspaper, Georgina then went on to make the following comment regarding the auction to Bloomberg news “Some of the collectors are becoming more conservative, but overall the art market is still very strong”. Hmmm, seems like someone doesn’t know whether they are coming or going.

Other than the fact that these two statements contradict themselves, stating that the market is currently experiencing a correction that is seemingly based on this one sale is rather silly. A market correction is generally understood to mean a drop of between 10% and 20% in a financial market over a short period of time which would require a general market downward trend. Taking into consideration that there has been very little indication that the market is losing strength other than the Sotheby’s auction and that there are no figures relating to the definition of a market correction to back this statement up, to state that the market is experiencing a correction is very premature and at this point, incorrect.

Further evidence that the market is not in a correction came from an auction that took place the next evening by Bonhams and Goodman which experienced a far different result to Sothebys. According to the Bonhams and Goodman website “Record numbers had inspected the paintings at viewings in Sydney and Melbourne, with over 1500 people attending the auction venues, 30% up on the numbers for April. On auction night 250 people packed the Prahran saleroom to see Masterpieces of Australian Art from The Julian & Miriam Sterling Collection sell for $1,976,000 (including buyer’s premium), well over the lower estimate published in the catalogue. The sale of the Australian Fine Art catalogue contributed another $3 million to the result. ” Geoffrey Smith, Director & National Head of Art at Bonhams and Goodman went on to comment that “It was our most successful sale ever.” In total $4.9 million of art was sold against a lower estimate of $3.6 million although interestingly, only 49% of works sold which was the same percentage of works that sold at the Sotheby’s auction. What these results do show is that people are paying more money for the best works and that, although the sale rates may give the appearance of a correction, an proper analysis of the whole market points to more of a market transformation (ie. a change in buying trends and habits as opposed to a down-turn)

Another telling indication that the problem may be with Sotheby’s and not the market is the fact that only around 150 reportedly turned up at the Sotheby’s auction compared with 250 at the Bonhams and Goodman auction. With several more important art auction scheduled in Australia over the coming weeks it will be interesting to see what the results will be.

**Nicholas Forrest is an art market analyst, art critic and journalist based in Sydney, Australia. He is the founder of http://www.artmarketblog.com, writes the art column for the magazine Antiques and Collectibles for Pleasure and Profit and contributes to many other publications

Damien Hirst Screws Himself – artmarketblog.com

Damien Hirst Screws Himself – artmarketblog.com

On the 15th and 16th of September a total of 223 previously unsold works by Damien Hirst will go under the hammer at Sotheby’s. The collection consists mainly of different versions of Hirst’s most iconic concepts including versions of his spot paintings, spin paintings, butterfly paintings, medicine cabinets, formaldehyde works and photo realist paintings.

In continuation from my previous post on this auction I have conducted some further research on Damien Hirst and the market for his work which resulted in some rather interesting results. The online art auction result database Artprice.com lists a total of 1013 Damien Hirst works sold at auction since 1992, 169 of which were auctioned in 2007 which means that the Sotheby’s auction of 223 Damien Hirst works will account for more than a years worth of auction results. Comparatively, Jeff Koons, who is 10 years Damien’s senior, only has 524 auction recorded auction results since 1991.

The fact that Hirst has made the decision to sell at auction partly because the commission rates charged by an auction house are lower than those charged by most galleries suggests that his motivation is mostly, if not purely, financial. Although the demand for Hirst’s work is very high there are already plenty of works on the market due to the huge number of works that Hirst produces. This makes me wonder how many people will be buying from this auction purely because of the nature of the sale as opposed to the quality, price or attraction of the work on offer. I would say probably lots. If there are lots of people buying purely as a result of the nature of the sale then this could result in people buying works from this auction at inflated prices created by a false perception of scarcity and immediacy created by Sothebys when in fact there are already plenty of Hirst works available for sale elsewhere.

There are basically two different outcomes for this auction both of which I perceive as being potentially detrimental to Hirst’s career. Firstly, a successful sale where a majority of the works are sold for above estimate will result in a glut of Damien Hirst works being thrust onto the market which could well result in the demand and desirability Hirst’s work to drop due to the availability of works increasing dramatically. The effect that the sale of these works will have on the market for Hirst’s work depends on how many people are purchasing with the intention of on-selling within a short period of time. Scenario number two is that the sale goes terribly which would of course result in Hirst’s reputation and value dropping.

To be continued….

**Nicholas Forrest is an art market analyst, art critic and journalist based in Sydney, Australia. He is the founder of http://www.artmarketblog.com, writes the art column for the magazine Antiques and Collectibles for Pleasure and Profit and contributes to many other publications

Oz Artist Resale Royalty Boost – artmarketblog.com

Oz Artist Resale Royalty Boost – artmarketblog.com

For those who regular readers of my blog, you will be aware that I am an Australian and that I am a strong supporter of the implementation of an artist’s resale right in Australia. Just because the current Australian government made the decision to introduce a resale royalty scheme does not mean that the whole resale royalty saga is over. All that the Australian government has done is made the promise to implement a resale royalty, they have not said when it will be implemented or what model will be implemented. There are many different resale royalty model options that the government could choose to implement some of which are downright ridiculous and potentially ineffective.

On Friday an announcement was made that will be signal a major boost to the Australian art world with a press release being made public announcing that Joanna Cave, CEO of the UK’s primary copyright and collecting society for artists and visual creators DACS (Design and Artists Copyright Society), will be moving to Australian in January 2009. Joanna will be moving to Australia to take up the position of CEO of Australia’s copyright and collecting society for artists and visual creators and sister society of DACS, Viscopy. What makes this announcement so exciting is that Joanna Cave is probably the world’s most knowledgeable and experienced person on the resale right for visual artists having successfully implemented the resale right in the UK. Now that such an influential person will be coming to Australia there is a much better chance that the resale right model that is implemented will be the most effective and managable model. There is also now a much better chance that the resale right will be implemented smoothly, effectively and with the smallest amount of disruption due to the experience, knowledge and wisdom of Joanna cave.

See the press release from DACS below.

Design and Artists Copyright Society

News release

22 August 2008

CHANGE OF LEADERSHIP AT DACS

DACS’ Board of Directors today announced the resignation of Chief Executive Joanna Cave after eight years of dynamic leadership.

During that time, DACS (the Design and Artists Copyright Society) has changed in both size and profile, and now enjoys a strong reputation among artists whilst generating almost £9 million annually through its three rights management services.

Most recently, Joanna led the campaign for the Artist’s Resale Right in the UK – against fierce opposition in some quarters – which culminated in the government introducing legislation that delivers genuine benefit to artists without harming the market for art.

Since 2006, DACS has collected £6.3 million in resale royalties for over 1500 artists and DACS’ service is recognised as the best in the world.

DACS Chair Andrew Potter says: ‘Many thousands of artists, designers and photographers have every reason to be grateful to Joanna for her hard-won achievements on their behalf. She leaves DACS in great shape, doing a brilliant job on behalf of its members. I, the Board and everyone at DACS will miss her greatly, both professionally and personally. Everyone who works with Jo holds her in the highest regard.’

It is the success of the UK Resale Right campaign that has led Joanna to her next challenge, spearheading the campaign for the Artist’s Resale Right in Australia and New Zealand.

Michael Keighery, Chair of DACS’s equivalent organisation, VISCOPY, in Sydney, says: ‘Jo has been a tireless advocate for artists in the UK and on the international stage. Under her leadership Australian and New Zealand artists can look forward to VISCOPY championing their rights with great commitment and energy.’

Joanna says: ‘It’s a privilege to have been part of the DACS success story and leaving after eight happy years is going to be a wrench. But I am excited about the opportunity to work on behalf of artists in Australia and New Zealand. The Artist’s Resale Right is hugely important not least for indigenous artists, many of whom continue to be poorly rewarded for their work, despite its current popularity throughout the world’.

Joanna Cave will take up her new post in Australia in January 2009. DACS has commenced its search for her successor. Details of the vacancy will be available on http://www.dacs.org.uk.

For further information, please call Joanne Milmoe on 020 7336 8811.

**Nicholas Forrest is an art market analyst, art critic and journalist based in Sydney, Australia. He is the founder of http://www.artmarketblog.com, writes the art column for the magazine Antiques and Collectibles for Pleasure and Profit and contributes to many other publications