Network of Arts and Culture Websites Creates New Model for Online Publishing – artmarketblog.com

For Immediate Release

Contact: Brigid Brown, Publicist

Cell) 551.358.1058

brigidbrown13@yahoo.com

Network of Arts and Culture Websites Creates New Model for Online Publishing

“Life in the arts has taught (Kathryn) Born that you can’t have a life in the arts unless you’re ‘able to work for free or almost nothing.’ She thinks that’s wrong … “

Chicago Reader, January 2010

The network of websites that comprise Chicago Art Map and Chicago Art Magazine are not simply local websites but a case study for a new model of online publishing.

See: http://chicagoartmagazine.com/transparency-pages/

“Print media is in a mindset that online publishing is simply posting on a screen rather than printing on paper,” says Kathryn Born, founder of the CAM. “It’s rarely utilizing the internet’s capabilities to connecting the story ancillary data and deeper pools of information. It doesn’t harness the power of online distributions, which can categorize and deliver content to the audience — in the exact moment and form they wish to receive it.”

What does that have to do with Chicago Art Map? The network stands as a proof-of-concept of new publishing through several scenarios.  The key example is that Chicago has 300 art venues and countless events every week. Comprehensive lists are ideal, but unwieldy.

The answer? Put all the information into a database instead of a list. Put a Google Map layer on top, add images, and code additional software tools so the events can be sorted and filtered.

The result? Search an art map by geographical range or  exhibit type (a museum vs. a gallery or alternative art space) or type of art or type of event. Sort alphabetically or by neighborhood,   location, specialty and filtered by date and geography.

For Chicago Art Magazine, footnotes are back in style using “hovering” tools, paragraphs of extra information expand with a click to instantly reveals more information (without refreshing the page).   And images! Since ink is no longer a cost factor, they’re abundant, and expand to full size when clicked upon.

Chicago Art Magazine doesn’t publish monthly, it publishes twice a day. Each piece is pushed out to over 5,000 Facebook and Twitter followers.

It’s operational budget, for what would-be a 200 page magazine, is only $1,700 a month. Every dime goes to writers, editors and staff. No rent, no paper, no trucks. Suddenly, an advertising-based model that only requires $2000 per month to support freelancers and stay in the black, is attainable, often with sole-sponsorship deals that provide a blast of coverage for only a few sponsors each month.

“‘Advertorial; content is permissible, but only if it’s fully disclosed in every instance,” is the policy of the magazine, as they are supported with “sponsored posts” along with graphic advertisements.

Most unusual, yet still in accordance with the Open source (software) background that prepared Kathryn Born for the task, is the idea of freely sharing ideas so that others can build upon what was learned. A tab called “transparency” reveals everything from tech tricks, to philosophy and budgets. A weekly blog gets into even smaller details about editorial and survival

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The site speaks to all tiers of art fans whether a seasoned collector or a newbie looking to go out on a Friday evening. This breadth of reviews is credited to the aptly named “Friday Night Army” which is a team of critics, released onto the city, with the mission to report back on what is seen and heard in their own voice. “The editorial goal is to write about art in a simple, lively way, using pictures, video and audio,” says Born. “Our belief is that writing about art can be a literary style that’s as colorful as the art we describe.”

Chicago Art Magazine ~ Reviews & Features

Chicago Art Map ~ One-Stop-Shop Gallery Finder

The Chicago Art Machine speaks to all tiers of art fans whether it is a collector on the prowl for the latest discovery or a newbie looking to branch out. This breadth can be credited to the aptly named “Friday Night Army” which is a team of critics, released onto the city, with the mission to report back on what is seen and heard in their own voice.

Some features are more mainstream like, “The Bath Haus of Gaga” and others more niche-y but still accessible such as, “A Crash of Critters at Fill in the Blank”. No matter what genre, each article is informative and as a whole the network feels like a mini-course in art history. After a short time of perusing the sites, visitors will walk away knowing way more than when they started.

“The editorial goal is to write about art in a simple, lively way with a whole bunch of pictures, video and audio,” says Born. “The belief is that writing about art can be a literary style that’s as colorful as the art we describe.”

Kathryn Born is the Editor-in-Chief of the online Chicago Art Magazine and oversees ChicagoArtMap.com. Born breaking off to start her own network of sites, Born had created the blog Art Talk Chicago for the Chicago Tribune-sponsored network of blogs called ChicagoNow.com.

If you plan to run a review and/or would like to set up an interview with Kathryn Born, please contact: Brigid Brown @ 551.358.1058 or brigidbrown13@yahoo.com

Visit us online at: www.chicagoartmagazine.com

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Susan Graham at Compound Editions – artmarketblog.com

Susan Graham at Compound Editions – artmarketblog.com

Susan Graham Vessel for Safekeeping (Survivalism) 2009 Porcelain Edtion of 50, plus 10 APs $250.00 each

Susan Graham Vessel for Safekeeping (Survivalism) 2009 Porcelain Edtion of 50, plus 10 APs $250.00 each

It is good to see that there are people willing to make a stand against the global economic crisis and start new ventures to promote the work of emerging artists even though many would shy away from making such commitments. Two such people are the owners of Schroeder Romero and Winkleman Gallery who launched Compound Editions, a collaborative fine art multiples publishing venture, in November last year. The latest offering from Compound Editions is by New York based artist Susan Graham who has created a fantastically witty work that is very much a memento of our times. “Vessel for Safekeeping (Survivalism)” is a sort of “alternative” mantel piece ornament that consists of a hand sculptured and hand glazed porcelain lacy box which contains a porcelain credit card and porcelain scissors.

We all like to think that we have complete control over our financial status but Graham’s use of a very fragile and rigid material in the construction of the box, card, and in particular the scissors, suggests that we do not have as much control as we may think. Although a pair of scissors is provided to cut up the credit card the porcelain scissors are completely useless as though mocking the helplessness of the viewer. Even though we can’t cut the credit card with the scissors the fragility of the porcelain credit card makes it very vulnerable to damage, just like our financial status, if not properly taken care of. Graham also appears to be suggesting that our identities are very much defined by our financial status and that people judge others according to their financial means in much the same way as the sort of ornaments that a person has on their mantel piece can say a lot about them and and their family.

“Vessel for Safekeeping (Survivalism)” is an edition of 50 plus 10 APs and can be purchased for $250 from Schroeder Romero and Winkleman Gallery or by emailing compoundeditions[at]gmail.com

Further information and other editions can be found here:
http://compound-editions.blogspot.com/

Susan Graham has been included in numerous exhibitions in the United States and Europe including recent shows at the Tucson Museum Of Art, John Michael Kohler Arts Center in Sheboygan, Michigan; the Hudson River Museum in Yonkers, the Sherman Gallery at Boston University, Hunter College Leubsdorf Gallery, New York; the Musee d’art et d’industrie de Saint-Etienne, and the Musee International des Arts Modestes, Sete, France.

More info on Susan Graham and her work can be found here:

http://www.susangrahamart.com/

**Nicholas Forrest is an art market analyst, art critic and journalist based in Sydney, Australia. He is the founder of http://www.artmarketblog.com, writes the art column for the magazine Antiques and Collectibles for Pleasure and Profit and contributes to many other publications.

Selling High-End Art Online – artmarketblog.com

Selling High-End Art Online – artmarketblog.com

online1There are many different websites where one can buy and sell art but most of those websites are for artists to sell their work directly to the public. What if you want to sell a valuable and prized work from your collection?. Are there websites that cater to the secondary market?. The answer to both questions is definitely, yes. When selling a valuable work of art on the secondary market the first thing that would pop into most people’s heads would be one of the major art auction houses. Of course, the big art auction houses are extremely good at what they do but if you feel that the work of art you want to sell would benefit from being exposed to a much wider audience, or you would like a more flexible selling option, then there are several online alternatives. The sites that I have chosen represent the very best of the secondary market online art brokers. There are several less prestigious alternatives but when it comes to selling a valuable work of art you will want to make sure you have the right people for the job. It might not seem like a big deal but displaying your work of art for sale through an online broker with a bad reputation could not only result in your work not selling but could also mean that your work will continue to be associated with that dodgy dealer for years to come. Therefore, if you are wanting to sell a valuable work of art on the secondary market I suggest you use one of the sites that I have listed below or do plenty of research before using another site.

http://www.artcycle.com

ArtCycle is a new online art broker that not only provide a place to sell you art but act as the agent for the whole transaction. One of the great things about ArtCycle is that there is no cost to you if ArtCycle do not sell the artwork. According to their website:

“As a consignment service, we offer a unique environment for art collectors to buy and sell work in a way that is personally and financially rewarding. We are not an auction house nor are we a traditional gallery. We are collectors, like you, who bring years of expertise coupled with a fresh take on how art should be purchased.”

ArtCycle is a very attractive option for those wishing to sell higher end works of art but don’t want to take the traditional art auction house route.

http://www.artnet.com

Artnet are one of the world’s top online destinations for pretty much anything to do with buying and selling fine art. As well as a price database, online magazine, videos, event listings and more, Artnet also conduct online auctions. Artnet online auctions are only for serious collectors as you have to apply to become a seller on artnet. After your application is reviewed by artnet, you will, if approved, be offered the opportunity to sell via artnet Online Auctions. The vetting process ensures that the quality of work auctioned via artnet remains high and that the sellers are reputable.

http://www.artquid.com

Artquid are another relative newcomer to the online art broking world who have proven themselves to be worthy of inclusion in this list. According to their website:

“ArtQuid is a global marketplace for Art and Antiques, where professionals (Art dealers, Art galleries, Artists) and individuals (Collectors) from around the world can create their own online Private Gallery so that interested buyers can browse and purchase any items they want directly from any location.”

A very professional site combined with very low fees starting at 9.95 euro makes artquid well worth considering. Because the site is relatively new I would suggest using artquid in conjunction with another more established site such as artprice.com.

http://www.artprice.com

If you have anything to do with fine art you will undoubtedly have heard of artprice, the world’s most popular database of art auction results. As well as the price database, artprice.com also has an online classified section where you can advertise works of art, antiques and design that you want to sale. The great thing about the artprice.com classifieds is that when you search the price database for a particular artist you also a list of the works by that artist which are advertised for sale in the classified section. This means that every time someone searches for information on the artist who created the work you are selling, the item you have for sale will

http://www.askart.com

AskART are a very well known and well established site that is primarily an online database that contains information and price data on over 155,000 artists. As well as providing information on artists, askart.com also provide a marketplace section where anyone can advertise a work of art that they want to sell.

According to their website, the benefits of using AskART are:

• Your ads go live on AskART immediately, giving you exposure to our over 70,000 daily visitors.

• Ad notification is automatically sent to all collectors in our database who have registered an interest in your artist.

• They offer low fees and easy administration

• Buyers contact you directly – AskART collects no other fees or commissions.

As I mentioned at the beginning of this post there are many more websites that allow people to sell art online but many of them are far from adequate for those looking for a secure and reputable broker with a proven track record. The sites I have listed above are by far the best of the online art brokers and offer superior service plus a greater chance of a successful sale.

**Nicholas Forrest is an art market analyst, art critic and journalist based in Sydney, Australia. He is the founder of http://www.artmarketblog.com, writes the art column for the magazine Antiques and Collectibles for Pleasure and Profit and contributes to many other publications.